Member Q&A - Eslam Katab

Today, we meet Eslam - a PhD student at Munich University Hospital, Germany.

Go to the profile of Dr Alison Halliday
Mar 02, 2018
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1. What is your full name, job title and where do you work?

I am Eslam Katab, a PhD student at Munich University Hospital/ Gene Centre.

2. What are your main research interests?

Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy and Hemato-Oncology.

3. Describe your work in a tweet

I would recall the Science quote of 2013 breakthrough of the year:

"CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY: harnessing the immune system to battle tumours.”

4. What big projects are you working on right now?

Currently I am working on developing an ex-vivo culture system to grow Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia (CLL) cells outside the human body so that we can be able to test the different novel Bi-specific T-cell engagers (BiTEs) antibody constructs. Besides, we are interested in investigating the molecular mechanisms that might trigger T cell exhaustion.

5. Who do you collaborate with?

We are collaborating with various research groups from LMU, TU universities, Helmholtz centre and industrial Pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies as Roche and Amgen.

6. Tell us a bit about your career so far

I graduated from Pharmacy school at Cairo University in 2013. Then, I did a master’s in Biology at Ludwig Maximilian University Munich (LMU). During my master’s thesis, I have been working on assessing the role of amino acid in the processes of antigen selection and presentation. In October 2017, I started my PhD at the Translational Cancer Immunology lab at the Gene Centre-LMU. 

7. What are you most proud of?

I am so proud of the smooth transition I have done from Pharmacy to Immunology research and so satisfied about the results I achieved during my master’s study hoping that I continue achieving more during the doctoral study.

8. What’s your interest in the Cancer Immune Setpoint?

I think that Cancer Immune Setpoint is a good interactive tool that gathers all researchers working in the field of Tumour Immunology and Immunotherapy. Thus, it provides a helpful platform to exchange ideas and discuss all challenges in the field.

9. What do you hope it will achieve?

I am looking forward to seeing this network growing more and also getting the support of the field's experts. I believe such collaboration will have a great influence on the young researcher community and will be reflected in more collaborative work between them across the globe. 

10. What are your hopes for the future of cancer immunotherapy?

I wish we can understand more about the antigen selection and presentation processes. With such deeper understanding we might have a clue on how we can get rid of the lethal cytokine release syndrome side effect and certainly creating more effective and targeted therapies.

11. What advice do you have for others working in the field?

In my opinion, better understanding of both immunology and cancer biology is a crucial asset for any Tumour Immunologist. In addition, I think exchanging the ideas and widening your network will affect your knowledge positively.

12. What do you do to wind down?

Absolutely watching series, as I am a big fan of “The Big Bang Theory”. I also like hiking and wandering through the nature and sometimes it is worthy to hang out with some friends.

13. Tell us something unusual about yourself

I like cooking so much and all the time I seek for trying new recipes. Recently, I became an expert in baking two amazing cakes; Chocolate and coconut cakes.

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Go to the profile of Dr Alison Halliday

Dr Alison Halliday

Community Manager, Nature Research

Molecular Biologist turned freelance science communicator, with 10 year's experience at Cancer Research UK.

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